The origins of ice cream can be traced back to at least the 4th century Early references include the Roman emperor Nero (A.D 37-68) who ordered ice to be brought from the mountains and combined with fruit toppings, and King Tang (A.D 618-97) of Shang, China who had a method of creating ice and milk concoctions. Ice cream was likely brought from China back to Europe. Over time, recipes for ices, sherbets, and milk ices evolved and served in the fashionable Italian and French royal courts.

In United States, it was served by several famous Americans. George Washington and Thomas Jefferson served it to their guests. In 1700, Governor Bladen of Maryland was having served it to his guests. in 1774, a London caterer named Philip Lenzi announced in a New York newspaper that he would be offering for sale various confections, including ice cream. Dolly Madison served it in 1812.

First Ice Cream Parlor in America – Origins of English Name

The first ice cream parlor in America opened in New York City in 1776. American colonists were the first to use the term “ice cream”. The name came from the phrase “iced cream” that was similar to “iced tea”. The name was later abbreviated to “ice cream”.

Augustus Jackson: a confectioner from Philadelphia, created new recipes for making ice cream in 1832.

Nancy Johnson and William Young – Hand-Cranked Freezers

In 1846, Nancy Johnson patented a hand-cranked freezer that established the basic method of making ice cream still used today. William Young patented the similar “Johnson Ice-Cream Freezer” in 1848.

Jacob Fussel – Commercial Production

In 1851, Jacob Fussell in Baltimore established the first large-scale commercial ice cream plant. Alfred Cralle patented an ice cream mold and scooper used to serve on February 1897.

Good Humour Ice Cream Bar

In 1920, Harry Burt invented the Good Humor Ice Cream Bar and patented it in 1923. Burt sold his Good Humor bars from a fleet of white trucks equipped with bells and uniformed drivers.

Eskimo Pie

The idea for the Eskmio Pie was created by Chris Nelson, an ice cream shop owner from Onawa, Iowa. He thought up the idea in the spring of 1920, after he saw a young customer called Douglas Ressenden having difficulty choosing between ordering an ice cream sandwich and a chocolate bar. Nelson created the solution, a chocolate covered ice cream bar. The first Eskimo Pie chocolate covered ice cream bar on a stick was created in 1934.

Soft Ice Cream

British Chemists discovered a method of doubling the amount of air in ice cream creating soft ice cream.

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